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Showing most liked content since 02/09/2013 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    Hi Everyone! I found out that kids can skate and bowl free all summer long. All you have to do is go sign up at www.kidsbowlfree.com and register each child and www.kidsskatefree.com and register your child. Also check your local movie theaters they are offering the summer movie express and admission is only 1$ for everyone. All movies start at 10am.Kids can watch their favorite movies for nine weeks. They will play two movies for each week. A portion of the proceeds goes to the Will Rogers Institute.
  2. 4 points
    Hi all! I am brand new to this site, and I am so relieved to find out the feeling of being overwhelmed is completely normal! (I thought perhaps I should post, as I went on a "like" spree, on almost every response here! lol) My son is 4, will turn 5 in January, and I really feel that homeschooling is best for him. After finding this site, and Carolina Homeschooler association, I really feel much more confident in my decision, and myself! (I was really having feelings of thinking there's no way I'm "smart enough" to completely-from-day-1 homeschool, and how-in-the-world-am-I-ever-gonna-teach-myself-to-know-what-paid-teachers-know...but after reading all the info on this site, and reading posts like this one, it really, truly helps! I'm sorry to hijack this thread, I apologize, I am just so excited, and relieved to finally feel like I'm on the right track, both for me and my family.
  3. 4 points
    Weekends, summers, midnight star-gazing and interesting discussions, catching an unplanned TV special on the Civil War, or NASA, or black holes, or the Great Depression, or whatever, counts. If you're on a trip and listen to audiobooks in the car, that counts as reading/literature. If the books touch on science or social studies topics, then they count as that, too. Learning happens 24/7, 365 days a year. Your challenge is to remember to document it for 180 days out of those 365, starting on June 1, and running through May 31 (if you're a member of my 3rd option association). Warmly, Dianna
  4. 4 points
    Dianna hit the nail on the head! All day long at school my dd was in trouble for....TALKING to her friends! The nerve of her! No talking in the hall No talking in line No talking at your desk No talking at lunch Quiet in the library! Save your questions for the end! No talking in the bathroom, be out by the time I count down from 20 No talking during recess if you didn't finish your morning work Silent bus today! It's recess time! You have 10 minutes to talk, hurry up!
  5. 4 points
    Stephanie, there are ways to deal with the quizzing issue and non-supportive friends detailed here: http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/afaq6.html As far as the socialization question goes - the next time someone asks you that, ask them how many times did they hear "We're not here to socialize!" when they went to school. Just sayin... Warmly, Dianna
  6. 4 points
    Education. I can give my children a better education than the public/private schools can thanks to being able to tailor their curriculum to their needs/interests/strengths. The elem school near us is one of the best in the state, even recognized nationally, but that doesn't mean it's the best for my kids when I can homeschool them. I am glad we have such a good school near us though, for those who do not homeschool. That's the short answer. I stumbled into homeschooling when I realized that public kindy wouldn't work for my eldest wiggly boy who learned out of order. He was far ahead in application and analysis, but way behind in memorization. He wasn't a checklist kid. I didn't send any to pre-k since those programs weren't play-based enough. (Which is also why I'm not a fan of public kindy). As he's progressed, his behavior has changed to a point where he could handle public school - but his education needs have become much, much harder to meet. And so we homeschool! I also like sleeping in, seeing my kids, not fighting with car line, not worrying about homework, not worrying about teaching to the test or standardized testing, and being able to go on vacation when we want. It's also a huge plus that we can get everything done during the day normally, so we can just enjoy being a family when my husband isn't working. *Also, I'm a former public school teacher. So I know nothing magical happens in the classroom. I was a good public teacher and did meet the needs of my students, the best I could. But when you have 35 kids in a class, it's impossible to tailor it perfectly for every single student, no matter how good of a teacher you are.
  7. 4 points
    Welcome, Melissa G! I get the anxious thing! (I'm sure I"m not alone too!) I just pulled my oldest out of 7th grade public school in the middle of the school year and started homeschooling him in January. It sounds like we have a similar situation. He went from being a child who packed his own backpack full of books, crayons and paper just to sign up for preschool to a sullen, angry, disillusioned 12 year old. He's never been happier since we pulled him out. It hasn't been easy - we have days where we just can't stand to be in the same room as one another... but for the most part, I've gotten a lot more hugs, kisses and "I love you"s and he's beginning to love learning again. It sounds like you already have a great setup, and you've already been homeschooling without even knowing it! Getting started is scary, (I personally am obsessed with researching curriculum) but the thing I love most about homeshooling, is if you try something and it doesn't work, it's easy enough to switch! Knowing how your kids like to learn is important (kinesthetic, visual, auditory, etc) and there are sooooo many choices (which is why I'm obsessive about curriculum) that it will make your head spin. Personally, I found reading reviews to be just as confusing as helpful, because what works for one family won't necessarily work for another. If you're already taking care of all those animals and running your own homestead, being organized must be second-nature to you, and that will help. Keeping track of lessons, recordkeeping, etc. all takes time and organization. And I know you're probably thinking - I'm swamped already - but when you're not having to deal with the issues public school drops on your doorstep, you'll be amazed at the extra time you get! (Don't know what kind of schedule your son had, but mine was having between 2-3 hours of homework every night - even on weekends. Not dealing with that every day gave me plenty of time for lesson-planning and grading papers.) I will also be homeschooling a kindergartener this fall (as well as a 5th grader too). Frankly, the one that scares me the most is the kindergartener - making sure he has a good foundation and praying daily that I will be up to the task! I know one of the hardest things my 7th grader had adjusting to was his schedule at home. He was under the impression that he would send a set amount of time on each subject every day -- just like public school. So, if at the end of 45 minutes, he hadn't finished an assignment - he'd just quit (even if he'd spent 15 minutes staring out his window at the bird feeders). I explained the freedom he had now that he was at home - if he didn't have any trouble understanding the work and could finish it in 20 minutes - GREAT! If not, we could take and hour to really get it down.. and if we were frustrated beyond belief - we could skip it til tomorrow. Setting goals and accomplishing them has been our main focus -- not making sure he's busy for 45 minutes in each subject each day. Some days we do math first, some days history. Some days its a struggle to get him to do anything, other days he can't wait to read a particular history assignment or do a particular science experiment. One day a time (or sometimes one hour at a time - LOL!) has become my mantra... Sorry that I've rambled... I'm on a super-caffeine rush today
  8. 3 points
    Hello All! My family and I will be moving to the area very soon and we will be homeschooling. I have a seven year old son, a six year old son, a three year old daughter and a 2 year old son. We started off our year using a Waldorf curriculum and now we are heading more towards an unschooling perspective/eclectic homeschooling. We are on our own timeline and aren't necessarily into following any specific curriculum but rather allowing our children to follow their interests! We are always evolving:) I am interested in finding people with similar ideals but also just kind people who are also looking for friendship. We will not know anyone in this area and it's important to me that my kids make connections. They are super sweet kids!! We would love to get involved with a group that we can see on a weekly basis. I have found REACH and the Midlands unschooling group but am also looking for families closer to the Camden area as well that could get together for play dates, etc. We love to hike, we love playgrounds, swimming, legos, exploring, animals and many many other things. We also love to garden and we love to eat fresh organic food. That is just a little bit about us. I hope there are others in the area to connect with:) Looking forward to getting to know SC and making connections!
  9. 3 points
    Hi everyone! Here is a list of some great reading rewards programs that kids of all ages can enjoy. I will post more as I come across them. Sylvan's Book Adventure Reading Program, TD Bank Summer Reading Program, Scholastic Summer Reading Program, Books a Million, Chuck E. Cheese Summer Reading Program. Half Price Book.Summer Reading Program, iRead reading program, Showcase Cinemas Summer Reading Program, Sync Summer Reading Program for Teens.Pottery Barn Kids Summer Book Club. Happy Reading Everyone!
  10. 3 points
    I jot my plans down in a student planner. (Or fill in as they get done). Like Dianna mentioned, attendance gets done easily this way too. It's very simple. I use a student planner because I want my children to take some control of their education and it's helpful if they can write things in too. I like the weekly/monthy ones from Blue Sky. For a portfolio, you just need some samples of the work. Not all - just some. You can put in a few photos of projects/field trips if you wish. Or lists of books read, etc. It's up to you! You do not need to do standardized tests under most option 3 groups. (Though I read one group that did have it at one time - but that's very rare. Just don't pick one that requires it!) No professional evaluation is needed under option 3 either. I do write up some sort of evaluation of student progress twice a year and stick it into the portfolio. This can be a report card or just a summary. As for what the state "accepts," the state doesn't look for specifics of how we kept records, and in most cases - will never ask to see our records! Still keep them, as it is the law and it's best to be covered just in case.
  11. 3 points
    There are different ways to document educational activities, attendance, keep samples for a portfolio, etc. Once your membership is completed, you'll have access to my members area and there are forms you can download to keep track. (Or you can develop your own system.) When you get a chance, read through my Record-Keeping & Testing FAQs here: http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/homeschool-faqs/record-keeping-testing/ Under Option 3 in SC, you don't have test or submit test scores. It's completely normal to be overwhelmed and scared at first, but it does get better. I think you'll feel better after you read my FAQs (the one I linked above, and also my Beginning Homeschooling FAQ here: http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/homeschool-faqs/ Reading through all of them is helpful, but those two will probably help the most right now. Let me know if you have any other questions. Warmly, Dianna
  12. 3 points
    We are in Mt. Pleasant as well. 5 kids- 19 yr at C of C, 17yr girl, 13 girl, 8 girl, 2 boy
  13. 3 points
    I to am new to home schooling. I am the grandparents and guardian of two grandsons, one 14 who is autistic and ADHD and one 15 who has his challenges as well and is also ADHD. They both have been bullied in the public schools with no real assistance from the school system. We, my wife and I will give this a shot and the boys are really looking forward to this. Thank you for your responses, makes me feel a little more at ease.
  14. 3 points
    Yes. All learning counts. It's important for our children to understand that learning happens all the time - not only when they're on a schedule, not only from textbooks and workbooks, not only between the hours of 8:00 am and 3:00 pm on Mondays-Fridays, August-May. If they truly understand that, they'll be in learning mode the rest of their lives - always curious, always absorbing new ideas and information. Warmly, Dianna
  15. 3 points
    And it doesn't have to be in a neat 9-3 school day either! My husband wants in on this, and he already reads with them each night and like to do projects after dinner. Building an RC car with Daddy, while he teaches them about friction, after dinner, totally counts. I'm planning to save a lot of the science and some of the reading stuff for Daddy!
  16. 3 points
    Angela, Options 2 and 3 both refer to associations, and both provide the same legal avenue for us homeschool without having to register with the school district. Option 3 was introduced (and passed) in 1996 by homeschooling moms because Option 2 was too restrictive (provided for only one association, so we didn't have any choice other than registering through the local school district). The vast majority of SC homeschooling families use Option 3 associations because most don't require testing, are budget-friendly, and allow parents to choose their own curriculum without having to approve it. Also, Option 3 mandates that parents maintain their own records, so there's less paperwork, which leaves more time to focus on learning. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions. Warmly, Dianna
  17. 3 points
    I'm new here and wanted to thank everyone for the info! I've learned so much from this message board and it's really helped the anxiety I had.
  18. 3 points
    Okay - I'll throw in my hat here. I'm one of those who did start early, at 15. Texas Academy of Math and Sciences at University of North Texas. Benefit - there were 2 years of students there, 200 Jr and 200 Sr living in a dorm, so I wasn't totally with just 18 year olds in class. Graduated "high school" with 77 semester hours, and no high school classes for Jr and Sr year (all college, and not easy ones). B.S. at 19, M.S. from U of Michigan with DOE Fellowship paying for grad school at 21. Imagine being in grad school, and your class mates having to make sure wherever they were going that you were able to actually get in! If I went, they had to chose carefully. Worked as Radiological Engineer at SRS at 21. Do I regret it - NO! Because the school district I was in didn't allow me to advance. In 10th grade I had finished their math department. They wouldn't let me dual enroll. Freshman and Sophomore English were a repeat of the same books I had read in middle school in Michigan (military dad so we moved). And yet....I do NOT want my kids to go off early. Eldest will go off a few months before he turns 18 (current plan - rising 9th now). He will probably dual enroll some classes his last 3 semesters after he turns 16. But that will be to allow him to have more free and fun time in college. I never took fun classes. I never explored other options. I want them to experience a little more of life than I had the opportunity to do. So, fun jobs, summer camps, internships, volunteer work, teaching at the karate dojo (which he loves). I did raise him up to 8th this year, but with an end of Sept b-day it wasn't a big deal. In Ohio where he was born he would be finishing 8th this year. I debated doing the TIPS program with DS, and then didn't. I was too frustrated with the smart kid labels as a child that I guess I veered the other direction!
  19. 3 points
    That's the great thing about homeschooling is that learning doesn't have to fit in a box Bike riding, swimming, bowling, litle league, youth basketball, gymnastics and dance classes --- that's all PE for us. Music lessons, art classes, etc. all count as part of school too. The nice thing also is that by high school those same things can be part of your electives
  20. 3 points
    I strongly agree with this. I'm not advancing my son rapidly through grade levels. He's starting 7th grade next year and I'm deciding whether I'll count algebra as a high school credit, but I'm leaning towards not. It'll go on his hs transcript as courses taken before hs, but I don't expect I'll give a grade. There's SO MUCH available, we're not going to run out of material. Midlands Tech doesn't want students under 16 in classes. I might be able to swing it earlier but I think USC would be more likely for dual enrollment. But that's really expensive as well. MIT Open Courses and Coesura are possibilities. If he pushes to go to college early, you can always accelerate. It's tougher to drop back grades though. You may want to do some reading on the Well Trained Mind forums Accelerated Board as well. But unless your son is racing forward, dragging you behind, I wouldn't try to get him in high school early. You probably will want him to participate in talent searches... Duke TIP, NUMATS, and CTY are all programs that are available. USC has a PUPS program for kids in TIP. Start slow.
  21. 3 points
    Hi Kristina; Welcome! I can't speak to pulling out of school but I can tell you that I had one wiggly, extremely gifted, but w/ ADD-inattentive, dyslexic and dysgraphic little guy go through the public school system. But, we are talking about a different time - before Common Core -- and when parents were still invited into the public school classroom to help out. The problem for my ds was that he was bored - he hated writing - knew the material presented through 4th grade as a K5er. The schools solution was to bump him up a year, have me send in extra material, have him help tutor the other kids, send him on errands, never take away PE or recess (then they still had 2 recesses) and let him do a lot of his work orally. Middle School and High School were different birds and we had to figure out ways for him to get the material to them. All that to say, if public school is what you want, it can be done, but it will take a lot of work on your part. For what it's worth the ds I'm referring to graduated high school as an honor student and went on to graduate USC-Columbia. Jump ahead and I made the decision to home-school the other three. In that mix I have two more of the same along w/ one of them having major health problems. When my boys are under the age of 9 I do the majority of their school work sitting beside them helping them to stay focused. We do short lessons, we don't do tons of review or busy work - we cover the subjects making sure that they know the material but no boring them w/ a drill and kill attitude. They do handwriting but again we follow a quick and simple method so it's no more than maybe 5 mins and they write some of their math but other parts they simply tell me the answer. Soc Studies/History we cover history beginning w/ Ancient bec for my boys there is nothing is great as learning about the Egyptians and mummies I throw Soc Studies in by discussing monthly holidays or community helpers, people of noteworthiness , etc. but I don't spend a ton of time on it. For science we read and explore nature and do experiments -- bec my boys tend to be hands-on and benefit from touching, seeing and exploring. Spelling we use magnets and I don't stress about spelling if a child doesn't have the skills until later. Your ds is still young - he's curious and wants to be engaged in learning not sitting in a classroom -- that's understandable. As for your dh's concern -- look at his reasoning and then see what info you can help him to see a counter argument in favor of hsing v the traditional classroom. It took some doing for me to convince dh, but he's seen the fruits of my labor w/ our kids. Will it always be easy? NO! Do the blessings outweigh the struggles -- I can honestly say YES!
  22. 2 points
    Ripley's Aquarium (if that's the one you're talking about), gives homeschoolers a big discount. Be sure to take your membership letter or card with you for proof. Warmly, Dianna
  23. 2 points
    Seems I'm not the only one who just started with her 5 yo. Glad to know I have similar company to sound ideas off of, as well as seasoned parents to seek advice as needed. To be honest, the reason this association stood out to me was the amount of get togethers and 'field trips' that are offered. I can't wait to start getting out there and meeting other parents, and getting my son to know some more kids his age! Thank you for this group and its forums! Jennifer
  24. 2 points
    Welcome aboard! We are all here to help and support each other. Please do reach out to us! Diana, homeschool mom for 9 years
  25. 2 points
    Once things slow down, I'll try again. I don't think I'll wait until next November. I really want to do it. I was just weaker than my inner editor - but maybe I can buy a stronger lock next time ( ) and keep her away!
  26. 2 points
    I keep reading about documenting the days. Everyone seems to have a different opinion on documenting, what does the state accept as documentation? Do I just jot down what we do, keep the worksheets from each day, keep all tickets from events and take pictures? Not sure what to do. I read that in SC we have to submit test scores, and/or professional evaluation of student progress. How would I go about doing this? Is it normal to feel totally scared your not doing enough at the beginning? Will it get better?
  27. 2 points
    If you know anyone who needs 10th grade A Beka books, they are free. I don't resell them. They are all in like new shape. Comes with video guides too. Just message me if interested.
  28. 2 points
    There is a Facebook group called Upstate SC Tween and Teen Homeschoolers that does events for older homeschoolers in Greenville area. Some events are just for teens/Tweens, some also have younger kids. They have game nights, hang outs at Starbucks or Panera Bread etc.
  29. 2 points
    Hi Meg, I wish I was closer to you. I'm up in Greer and I teach violin (taught for several years in the schools, and now I just teach a few lessons at home to go along with homeschooling.) Anyway, I don't know anyone down there specifically to recommend, but I have a few ideas. Try contacting local stores that rent/sell instruments. They often keep a list of private teachers in the area, you might ask who they recommend and sort of compare notes between stores and see if there are any common names. I don't know much about the stores down there, but I do know Pecknell has a store down your way and I recommend for violin that you stay away from them to rent or buy an instrument. Their instrument quality, up here anyway, is pretty poor. Also, I'm not sure how close you are to USC, but they have an awesome music program. You might find a music education student who could teach violin. It would probably be cheaper for you and give the university student great experience. Lastly, instrument advice. Rent, don't buy. String instruments come in a variety of sizes to fit the child. A music store can size them, as can a teacher (if you're stuck let me know and I'll find the measurements and tell you how to do it. I just eyeball it now.) As the child grows, they have to get a new instrument. This can happen very quickly, or take a number of years. You absolutely do NOT want a child playing on an instrument that is too big for them. Now, that said, if you really, really, really don't want to rent or lease and just want to buy something and sell it later, check out sharmusic.com. They have an inexpensive line of violins that for their price have a good sound. (I have 4 kids, and I bought one for my oldest from them, knowing it would get passed down when he out grew it.) They are a great company, I've been getting things from them since I was a student. Please don't buy from ebay, or the Sears catalogue, etc. Most of those are just violin shaped objects that are essentially useless (won't stay in tune, etc). Anyway, hope some of that helps!
  30. 2 points
    There is no 4.5-hour daily requirement for Option 3 homeschoolers. Warmly, Dianna
  31. 2 points
    My MIL is an elementary school teacher and she told me about some stores offering discounts to teachers, but she didn't know if they would extend them to homeschooling families as well. Here's a list: http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/blog/2012/12/18/100-stores-that-give-a-teacher-discount/ Anyone know if these companies extend these discounts? Would be great to know! Thanks!
  32. 2 points
    Hi Kristi! We are also relatively new to SC and live about 20 minutes west of Orangeburg, right off of Hwy 4, in Neeses. This will be our first year homeschooling, so all of this is new to us too. We have 3 kids: 5 yo boy, 3 yo boy, and a 2 month old girl. There is a very active and helpful homeschool association in Orangeburg, Orangeburg Christian Home Educators Association (http://ochea.net/about/). I have spoken with one of their directors over the phone who was extremely helpful in guiding me in what steps we needed to take to homeschool legally in SC. OCHEA provides a lot of activities/events. They also have a co-op that meets every other Monday to provide PE, Art and Music classes for the elementary age groups. We will definitely be teaming up with them in the fall. To participate with them, you do have to be a member with an "Option 2" or "Option 3"(such as Carolina Homschooler) accountability group as well since OCHEA is not an accountability group. There are about 3-4 moms who get together every Thursday at the Orangeburg County Library on Louis Street for story time. It's at 10:30 am every Thursday. The story time on Thursday is for ages 2 and up. There's another one on Wednesdays at 10:30 for infants to 3 year olds. Our kids really enjoy story time and getting to spend time with their friends. We moms enjoy getting together to encourage each other as well. Hope this helps! Welcome to Orangeburg!
  33. 2 points
    This past school year was an interesting one, to say the least. My 12-year old daughter had a lot of health issues in the 2012-2013 school year...missing nine weeks of school, plus being hospitalized, and going to MUSC for studies. When last school year (2013-2014) rolled around, she was having so many doctor, therapist (to deal with the depression of not being able to attend school like her friends), and physical therapy appointments that she was missing more than attending. Her pediatrician took her out of school October 1st. The school district was supposed to set up homebound instruction...even with me working for the district I couldn't get anyone to follow through and start - I suspect it is because we live so far out that no one was willing to make the drive. I tried as best I could to keep her caught up through emails and texts with the sixth grade teachers, but it became too much. (My daughter has been state identified for Advanced Academic Placement since the end of second grade, and was a Duke TIP participant fourth through sixth grades.) In late October, I contacted the South Carolina Virtual Charter School, explaining all of Lilli's health issues and was told they would be a perfect fit for her. So, we began November 1st. Within a week, I realized they were not such a perfect fit. They told me that she had already been absent and needed excuses.....they were counting the time from when they sent supplies, not from the time we received them. Then, they wanted her to do all of that nine-week's assignments before the period ended, plus all the new stuff. We were working every night until 11:00. We kept getting notifications that she was late on assignments issued a month before we joined them. We worked through Christmas break getting everything caught up. Then, at the end of January, we couldn't access the SCVCS site to do anything. I called their tech support. I was told that there must be some cyber block keeping us from connecting to them because no matter what device we used, we got a "Page Not Available" message. I was told they would have their cyber guru figure it out an call me. I didn't receive a call. Instead, I got a nice letter in the mail telling me they had withdrawn Lilli from the SCVCS. I called to find out why and was told because she was absent five days - but, they would be glad to have her re-enroll next year. Not happening. So, I contacted Connections Academy and was told I had three days to get everything to them before their absolute cut-off for the year arrived. I sent everything electronically, except her transcript from SCVCS because I didn't have access to it any longer. Without that they said, "Sorry. We would love to have her next year." Thank God I found Carolina Homeschooler! I am no longer working, and can devote myself to making sure my youngest gets what she needs. I have already purchased all materials for the upcoming year. I plan to participate in as many local/state trips an get togethers as possible. I am considering having a gathering here when the summer activities start to wind down - we live on 20 acres outside of Columbia (at Cedar Creek) and have bunches of animals and an inground pool. Dads (and moms), feel free to contact me at frankhdgs@gmail.com or 803-414-4894. I have 21 years of experience in elementary education....I have a 31-year old son (he has an almost 8-year old son....so, I am Grandpa Frank), a 22-year old daughter (I think she has met the man she will marry), and my almost 13-year old daughter...our kids are 9 years and 10 months apart, each time.
  34. 2 points
    When my DS was that age, we used the American Story from Winter Promise. (note: WP is Christian, but American Story is easily adaptable to secular). Ultimately, I didn't really use the course guide or the note booking that much (DS hates note booking, but some love it), but instead their selection of books. It was a read aloud couple of years and we really enjoyed it and he learned a lot. If your pulling him home, something relaxed may be helpful. Many of the books were available at the library, and this was before SCLends. Story of the World is another easy history program. I can't stand reading the book out loud but enjoy listening to it in the car. There is an activity book if you like those types of thing (we don't) and you pair with a DK or Kingsfisher History Encyclopedia. Add in historical fiction if you want. Plenty of time for rabbit trails if you find something of interest at the library. Math - we've always used Math U See, and it works here. Language arts - I'm all over the place. Mostly piece together what works for each at the point in time we need it. However, I'm currently using Writing and Rhetoric from Classical Academic Press with DD and I've been very happy! It is a nice, gentle introduction to the classical ideas of writing. I wish it had been around when DS was that age! We have had little formal science - we live on a farm so science is real life. And regarding formal writing.....I've honestly pushed it off until they were older. I think our education system tends to push kids to do too much too early. And really, a standard book report is boring, whether in 3d, 5th, 7th, or 9th grade. Mine don't want to write it, and honestly I don't want to read it. No matter what you choose, be prepared to adapt. The curriculum needs to work for you and your kiddo, not y'all become a slave to the curriculum. Even when you *know* this, it is still tempting to worry...oh, we didn't do the project, we didn't complete the book, we didn't XYZ. Good luck.
  35. 2 points
    There is a website www.allinonehomeschool.com Easy Peasy. We are doing zoology for science and ancient history. It is broken up with L for lower grades and M for middle school. Each week I look through the content for both and pick what we will do, copy and paste it to a word document and print it out for our plan. The links on her site take them to the reading, games and sometime quizzes or worksheets you can print. We use you tube, ETV and National Geographic to find a documentary to go with the lesson one day history the next science and watch them during our lunch if we are indoors or at bedtime. (If it's long we do it in 2 days) I am using K12 independent study for Literature, Math and Spanish. We use Brain Pop too.
  36. 2 points
    We're in Mt Pleasant, too. One girl - age 9.
  37. 2 points
    I didn't want to use Christian Latin - only secular materials. I found that limited my choices. My eldest is using Galore Park Latin. He's only been doing it for 2 weeks, but it's going quite well and easy to understand from the books so far. There's a LOT crammed into those little books.
  38. 2 points
    Will homeschooling work for your family right now? If you think it may, then I'd strongly suggest trying it out again. Do not worry about high school yet - focus on giving your child what he needs now. Having only a high school diploma says absolutely nothing about your intelligence, so don't let that limit you. Even people with all sorts of fancy degrees aren't experts in everything. For me, foreign language was my biggest fear. So I found a computer-based program that worked for my eldest- something that needs zero involvement from me. Luckily, I've discovered that he doesn't have the same foreign language issues that I have. My weakness isn't getting in his way. Though it's probably more than just a weakness for me. I struggle learning things orally but was able to easily overcompensate in school with everything but foreign language. Otherwise, I could just learn alongside him. There are tutors out there. There are co-op classes. There are lots and lots of options. Unlike public school, if something isn't working, you change it. We have so many options. I've seen way too many elem teachers who couldn't teach math - and they were still teaching it! At least you don't have to teach it the school's way, so if you struggle with teaching anything, your student won't have to struggle. As for giving out grades - you don't have to give out grades. It does make high school transcripts look prettier, but you can use your own scale. Like A = full mastery. B = good understanding, C = struggling but learning some He can have a diploma - you can issue one. I don't know about you, but I was never ever asked to show my diploma for a job or to apply to college. I was asked for a copy of my transcript, which you can write up. (And get help writing up - there's lots of info online on how to do that).
  39. 2 points
    OK...HUGE aha for me! I thought even with Option 3 you had to do 4 hours to count as a day. Guess I need to work on MY reading comprehension! LOL I love this because one of the issues we are having with school, is that there just aren't enough hours in the day to do what he wants and I don't believe in overloading kids. However, I do believe that things like sports are important. He's been playing little league and sometimes we do not get home until 8:30p and then he can't get up at 7am to get ready for school the next day. This homeschooling stuff is getting better every day
  40. 2 points
    Hi Stephanie, there is no hourly requirement for homeschooling Option 3. You just have to document 180 days. All learning counts, even if it doesn't fit neatly into one of the required subject areas. You're not limited to teaching just those subjects. Warmly, Dianna
  41. 2 points
    That's exactly why my son is in trouble ALL the time! He even had a child tell him the other day that he wasn't invited to lunch with him when his dad was there because my he talks too much. Sorry - my son's verbal skills are off the charts and he likes to use them (like his mom) ;-) LOL Stephanie
  42. 2 points
    1) because I don't like busy work, and would have sent back homework undone. 2) DH has a crazy schedule, so it allows the kids to see him 3) the teachers would dislike me, which would make my kids school time difficult (see #1) 4) I skipped a number of grades myself, and don't see the point in much of it 5) I want my kids to learn how to think, to analyze information, not just do something because they are told 6) I'm too lazy to deal with a school system that I wasn't willing to work in (I considered teaching, thinking those who CAN should teach, I ran away) 7) NOW, we have a dyslexic child. There is no way the school would be able to provide the support and instruction I can provide. Instead of having a terrible self image, etc, my DD knows her issues, we joke about them, make necessary accommodations, and move on. 8) I think the push to do things at a younger and younger age burns them out, and also teaches to be automatons....do it this way, at this age, and meet XYZ requirements. Sometimes a book shouldn't be read in 7th grade, but when the person is old enough to actually understand! Maybe they don't need to write book reports until much older. I guess that's enough reasons. :-)
  43. 2 points
    Lorietta, also check out Duolingo at http://www.duolingo.com/ I've used several programs, and the one I recommend for pronunciation and vocabulary is the Learnables program. Students just listen and look at pictures to intuit meaning and grammar. It can get boring for students because the instructional method isn't varied, but students who stick with it learn a lot. I recommend that you supplement with online sites, etc., to mix things up a bit, though. Here's a link: http://www.learnables.com/ if you want to check it out. Warmly, Dianna
  44. 2 points
    Melissa, you're already homeschooling with all the learning that's going on at your house. Just build on that. You don't have to stick to a school schedule - learning happens on the weekends, evenings, during the summer, during vacations, etc., so you can homeschool around your work schedule. For answers to frequently asked questions, see my FAQs at http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/afaq.html If you have any other questions after reading through those, let me know. For more in-depth information, a description of different methods, typical days, favorite resources, and advice from hundreds of homeschooling parents who answered my surveys, see my guide: http://amzn.to/Mj41rh Warmly, Dianna
  45. 2 points
    We are in Colleton. We live just outside of Smoaks (between Smoaks and Ruffin). I have two high school age children.
  46. 2 points
    I'm going this year. A key would be to go through the list beforehand. It's huge so go through, as some sessions won't be helpful to you and others will. The speakers that I'm most interested in wouldn't meet the needs of someone focusing on a kindy kid for example. So, if you want speaker suggestions, let us know the grades of the children, if you use secular or religious, and if you have a particular homeschool style and maybe people similar to you will have some ideas.
  47. 2 points
    I've used Latin for Children. I don't have a background in Latin, so this was very helpful with CDs and DVDs.
  48. 2 points
    I agree that college is not the only choice after high school. It was most definitely my son's choice. However it doesn't look to be the path my daughter hopes to take. She is currently in 10th grade. I have begun to think about how to prepare her for life after high school. Currently she is trying to get a part time job. I think it will be very important for her to develop a resume and gain work experience while she is in high school. I also hope to be able to give her some type of aptitude test and the opportunity to shadow people in different jobs that might interest her,
  49. 2 points
    We just moved to Colleton county and looking for homeschoolers. I posted on all of the Walterboro & Colleton Swap pages and got only one response.
  50. 2 points
    What part of Colleton? We are in Berkeley County (Hwy 176 area) we might be interested.
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