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Questions about curriculum for K1


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#1 Lorietta Purpura

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 08:08 PM

I am wondering what sort of curriculum  others are using as I am currently  trying to find one suitable for my son. I am in Mount Pleasant, SC. There are just too many out there and I am a little bit overwhelmed. :rolleyes:

 

I would certainly appreciate if those already homeschooling their kids, could jump in and offer me some tips and advice.

 

Thanks!!!!

 

 



#2 Dianna

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 11:37 AM

Lorietta, for that age, I suggest reading aloud a variety of children's books (fiction and non-fiction), follow their interests as much as possible, visit museums and zoos, take them on field trips, let them watch educational television, visit educational websites, etc.

 

If you want to introduce handwriting, I like the Italic Handwriting series (for print - I don't like the cursive part for various reasons). It's available here: http://www.handwritingsuccess.com/

 

If you want a structured math program for this age, consider Math U See: http://mathusee.com/  or Miquon http://miquonmath.com/ (both use manipulatives - read reviews from current users and look at the samples/demos at the websites). There are other math programs, too... these just immediately came to mind.

 

For science and social studies, I'd definitely stick with the books, field trips, etc., that I mentioned above. It's much better than textbooks.

 

I also love the magazines available for this age, Ladybug and Click (see more info here: http://www.cricketma...m/kids_home.asp).

 

If you want more of a structured curriculum, one that's less school-ish than others is Five in a Row - here's a link: http://fiveinarow.com/

 

I hope others will come in a share their favorites. When you get a chance, read through my FAQs for more info about homeschooling (http://www.carolinah...r.com/afaq.html).

 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

 

Warmly,

Dianna


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#3 Beth62442

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 02:57 PM

Hi Loretta!

I feel totally blessed to have such vast choice of curriculums -- but the flip side is the overwhelming feeling you get when you have to finally choose! :wacko:

 

I will be using Math-U-See for my kindergartener this fall - I love the manipulatives that come with the program - I have three lego fanatics, so that kind of made it a no-brainer...

 

I've also found a program called Logic of English Foundations that I'm going to be using - it covers phonics, spelling, reading and handwriting.  I love the idea of how they introduce the phonograms, and I think this will really help my 5-year-old since he is taking speech therapy through the public school.  It's kind of expensive, but since it covers so much it will be worth it (I hope).

 

For science, we're going to be following along with his big brothers when they do their science labs.  I will probably also supplement with some stuff about the planets and starts, measuring, seasons and the weather.

 

For social studies we'll be reading a lot of age-appropriate books about historical figures and holidays,  I'm thinking about supplementing with Five-in-a-Row once I verify that most of the books in their "LIterature Pack" can be found at my local library (the Spartanburg Library is usually pretty good).  I am also the Cubmaster for our local Cub Scout troop, (with a Webelo and First Class Scout in Boy Scouts) and we do a lot of community/civics based stuff (trips to the fire dept., city hall, volunteer work) that I figure can count for a social studies lesson.   :D

 

Hope that helps!


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#4 cato

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 08:38 AM

Well your off to a good start with Carolina Homeschooler! :)There is lot available b/c so many kids learn so differantly . Its very overwhelming. I was in your shoes last fall looking for k5. I'm still learning things, probably will forever. I am gonna suggest Kathy Duffys Book 101 top picks. Helped me figure out my daughters learning style and which way i needed to go. Then I went to a convention recently and was able to flip threw and look at all my ideas for 1st. I even learned something new after hearing some wonderful speakers and discovered a math book (math lessons for a living education by Queen) I knew nothing about, that my daughter has shown to LOVE. I got it mainly for a review for 5k and now know I'm going to get it for 1st. See still learning :) Our style is more CM and next yr going with Heart of Dakota as my spine + this math and maybe along with singapore(gotta see about that really b/c might be too much math...more learning to come) and CM readers and workbooks using the First Steps series, McGuffy books and Language Lessons also by Queen. I will say my daughter is getting a lot from the Going for the Code books and just moved onto Explode the Code for phonics. Its a series too. Our park group is having a curriculum show and tell soon too which I thought was a neat idea. So finding a local play group might help too. I hope that helps.

Edited by cato, 05 April 2014 - 08:51 AM.


#5 kohlby

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 02:01 PM

I unschool kindy, so choosing a curriculum was quite easy - since I didn't. They learned an amazing amount just from an educational-rich environment.  So, don't feel that you have to pick a curriculum - or that it's a big deal if you pick one that doesn't work and you decide to change things.  That's one of the biggest perks to homeschooling.  You won't be stuck in whatever you choose or don't choose.  Have fun!



#6 Dana

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:27 AM

For math, I used Miquon and Singapore for my son.

With Miquon you do absolutely need the Lab Sheet Annotations to figure out what the sheets are wanting you to do. But Miquon and unmarked Cuisinaire rods gives a VERY solid foundation.

 

We did a lot of reading.

Ds actually learned to read by Calvin and Hobbes. We'd do a lot of reading aloud. I'd read some cartoons to him and he wanted to read more when I wouldn't read to him.

 

As you get started, some of the best advice IMO is to start slowly. Start with reading and math only, then add in other subjects gradually. At that age, I'd do a lot of hands on projects (in retrospect). Use read-alouds to count for science and social studies as well.

 

If I were starting over, I'd also probably have chosen Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding for our science. There's a yahoo group for it: BFSU. It's a lot of work and pretty teacher intensive on the set up, but I'm really impressed by how it works for some students.

 

Good luck!!


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#7 Lorietta Purpura

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 07:40 AM

Miquon and SIngapore- the latter peeked my interest as I am from singapore :)

Well- I guess I will be doing plenty of reading with the info shared here. Thank you everyone for your input!


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#8 Dana

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 10:57 AM

Singapore: http://www.singapore...y_Math_s/21.htm

I prefer the Standards edition to the US edition.

Musts are the textbook (A & B ), workbook (A & B ), and Home Instructor's Guide.

We used the Tests as extra practice problems when needed, along with Spectrum workbooks.

We used Intensive Practice as well (not for Standards but matches up pretty well), Challenging Word Problems (older edition), and iExcel (now replaced by Process Skills).

 

I liked Miquon's approach to long division better than Singapore's.

The use of Cuisinaire rods with Miquon led really nicely to Singapore's bar model approach, which I've been REALLY pleased with.

I also felt that Base 10 blocks were a must for the manipulatives as well.

 

I've been very pleased with the foundation from Miquon & Singapore & my son's been in great shape for moving on to Art of Problem Solving materials.


Edited by Dana, 08 April 2014 - 10:58 AM.

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