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Want to begin homeschooling but scared and don't know where to start

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#1 Cyndie Wright Creasman

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 07:55 PM

I am wanting to start homeschooling my 9yo and 6yo on a year round curriculum starting this July. I follow several homeschool blogs and several facebook accounts but it doesn't do any good if I can't ask questions about my specific state. My 9yo is gifted and talented and my 6yo is lagging behind. How do I find the curriculum to keep the oldest ahead and help the younger catch up. I will also have a kindergardner added for next year. I think I can do this once I get started but I'm scared to death to start.

Any help would be appreciated,

Cyndie



#2 Dianna

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 10:19 PM

Welcome to our community, Cyndie. :)

 

When you get a chance, read through my FAQs for details about homeschooling in South Carolina: http://www.carolinah...r.com/afaq.html

 

I recommend that you follow their interests as much as possible when choosing what to learn. You don't have to pattern your learning after the school system by using textbooks or similar methods. You can use websites, books, magazines, museums, zoos, documentaries, experiments, cooking, etc., in your homeschool.

 

You said you've been reading Facebook and blogs. What curriculum or homeschooling method sounds good to you so far? If we know that, we would be better able to make specific recommendations for you.

 

Warmly,

Dianna



#3 Cyndie Wright Creasman

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 06:09 PM

The unschooling sounds like what my kids would possibly work best in. My oldest is hungry for knowledge and the 6yo is more "show me or let me do it and I get it" kind of learner. I have read over your site several times and have finally convineced my husband to let me try. The getting started part is overwhelming. What resources will my gifted/talented need and what will my younger one need to catch up her learning or do I just start with basics and see what direction they both head in? I don't want to start off in the wrong direction and set my kids up to fail from the get go.

 

Thank you for your time...

 

P.S. My husband reading your website is what pushed him over the debate wall and agreed to let me try. Love your site, thank you for your support


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#4 Dianna

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 12:33 PM

Cyndie, I'm glad I could help both of you!

 

Start with what they know and go from there. You may want to get a more structured curriculum for math and writing, and unschool the rest of the subjects. Younger children develop at different rates, so it's hard for me to think of any child the age of 6 as "behind." I encourage you to stop thinking that way, too, regardless of what the school may have told you.

 

For reading:

For your youngest, try starfall.com for learning how to read. For your oldest, let him/her read as much and as widely as possible, tying some of his/her books into science and social studies topics.

 

For math, consider Miquon Math, Math-U-See, and Singapore. My boys used a combination of Miquon and Singapore math programs, but my daughter does better with Math-U-See. There are other resources if these don't appeal to you.

 

Here are links to all three so you can read more about them:

http://store.mathuse...log/math-u-see/

http://miquonmath.com/

http://www.singaporemath.com/

 

There are a lot of resources for writing. Here are two:

http://iew.com/

http://www.commonsen...om/wordsmth.htm

 

I use a variety of resources to mix and match, so hopefully others will jump in with their favorites.

 

For handwriting, try http://www.handwritingsuccess.com/ (but only for print - don't use the cursive)

 

For science and social studies - coordinate this with their reading as much as possible, and go to museums and zoos, take field trips, visit historical sites, watch educational TV and documentaries, do experiments, etc.

 

I also love the Cricket magazine group magazines: http://www.cricketma...ist.aspx?type=M and use them extensively in our homeschooling.

 

Call them to ask for samples (not sure if they still mail them out free or not). Try Click for your two youngest. Your 9-year-old may still enjoy it, too, but may enjoy Ask better (those relate to science and social studies). Try Appleseeds for your oldest (it's history/social studies, mostly, with science from time to time).  The age guidelines at the website skew high, in my opinion. (Muse, Odyssey, and Cobblestone, should wait for after children outgrow the younger versions.)

 

I like their literary magazines, too (try Ladybug for your youngest, and Spider for your 9-year-old).

 

I guess I've thrown enough at you to start with. Let me know if you have any questions. Others will probably jump in with their favorite resources, too!

 

Warmly,

Dianna


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#5 ShadanJem

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 09:41 PM

History idea together - I have a love / hate affair with Susan Wise Bauer's Story of the World.  After hating it for years, I found what works for *our* family.  We listen to the audio books in the car.  I *like* listing to SOTW in the car.  I do NOT like reading it out loud.  That was an interesting realization. Some weeks we listen to hours of the book as we drive around....some weeks, nada.

 

Then, I supplement with DK Encyclopedia (there are different recommendations for different ages levels, I've used both at different times), Usborne books, etc, or other books from the library.  Plus some historical fiction / myths / architecture, etc, if we like it.  Some supplemental books are definitely geared towards the eldest, and the youngest played, some were geared towards the youngest, and the oldest went and did his other independent reading, or he sat and listened as well.    While listening mine often doing something else....color, draw, etc.  Note: even my 13 ds enjoys read aloud time.  I thought he would have outgrown it....nope.  

 

SOTW has an activity guide for each book if you wish to use it.  It didn't work for *us* but many families love the activity guide.  Just remember that how much of it you choose to use it UP TO YOU!  

 

Math - we use Math U See.  Not that I'm opposed to switching, but I picked it when DS was 4, and he has chosen to stay with it for high school (as of now).  So I've done Primer - Algebra 1 and have Algebra 2 and Geometry waiting for next year.  Since it's up to me :) I tweak them as needed for each child.  



#6 stephmcgrath

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 05:48 PM

hi - just wanted to share, I found a code online for Cricket magazine discounts - the code is N2028 - enter it at checkout. I just used it and it saved me several dollars per magazine!

 

thanks,

Stephanie


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