stephmcgrath

May I ask...Why do YOU homeschool?

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As someone just starting out AND as someone who has gotten a lot of looks/questions/comments from just mentioning that I MIGHT homeschool, I'm curious to hear why YOU homeschool? Thought it would be fun to ask and see the variety of answers. :)

 

So...who will go first?

 

 

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Several reasons - my husband was on second shift and wouldn't have been able to see our son (only one at the time) during the week once he started school. I was working as a school psychologist in our local schools and saw how much learning really happened (or didn't) in the classroom. Many times it wasn't the teacher's fault - it was all the paperwork, bureaucracy, and testing they had to work around in order to teach. Sometimes it was the teacher, though, like the one who punished children who were motivated enough to work ahead on a math assignment. She kept them inside during recess. Her reasoning? They didn't follow directions. You can bet those children "learned their place" and won't be motivated go beyond what's asked of them ever again. I could share many stories like this, but the main reason we homeschool is it's a lifestyle choice for us - we enjoy being around our children and learning with them.

 

Warmly,

Dianna

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Son has severe food allergies.

I think we wouldn't have kept homeschooling a couple of times if I hadn't expected him to possibly die if he went to school.

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1) because I don't like busy work, and would have sent back homework undone.

2) DH has a crazy schedule, so it allows the kids to see him

3) the teachers would dislike me, which would make my kids school time difficult (see #1)

4) I skipped a number of grades myself, and don't see the point in much of it

5) I want my kids to learn how to think, to analyze information, not just do something because they are told

6) I'm too lazy to deal with a school system that I wasn't willing to work in (I considered teaching, thinking those who CAN should teach, I ran away)

7) NOW, we have a dyslexic child.  There is no way the school would be able to provide the support and instruction I can provide.  Instead of having a terrible self image, etc, my DD knows her issues, we joke about them, make necessary accommodations, and move on.

8) I think the push to do things at a younger and younger age burns them out, and also teaches to be automatons....do it this way, at this age, and meet XYZ requirements.  Sometimes a book shouldn't be read in 7th grade, but when the person is old enough to actually understand!  Maybe they don't need to write book reports until much older.

I guess that's enough reasons. :-)

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As a military family, it started out because of an assignment where the area and schools were bad.  I couldn't expose my kids to that.  So when they were going into fourth and second grade we pulled them out of school (until then we had been pleased with schools and teachers).  I won't say it wasn't tough to start.  Although I was an involved parent, I had to learn their learning styles, etc.  We had some tears but we had a lot of good days too!  It was supposed to be a 2 year assignment that turned it to 4.  By then we had homeschooled longer than they had been in school.  Then a probable 1 year assignment overseas, why put them back for a year?!  When we came back to the states, they didn't want to go back and I wasn't going to send them.  I love having them home with me, I love teaching them and watching them learn, I love the freedom of vacationing when we want, and I love our time together!  And no matter where we move or how often, schooling doesn't have to change - they are not ahead or behind - we just keep on keeping on! 

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Education.

 

I can give my children a better education than the public/private schools can thanks to being able to tailor their curriculum to their needs/interests/strengths.  The elem school near us is one of the best in the state, even recognized nationally, but that doesn't mean it's the best for my kids when I can homeschool them.  I am glad we have such a good school near us though, for those who do not homeschool.

 

That's the short answer.  I stumbled into homeschooling when I realized that public kindy wouldn't work for my eldest wiggly boy who learned out of order.  He was far ahead in application and analysis, but way behind in memorization.  He wasn't a checklist kid.  I didn't send any to pre-k since those programs weren't play-based enough.  (Which is also why I'm not a fan of public kindy).  As he's progressed, his behavior has changed to a point where he could handle public school - but his education needs have become much, much harder to meet.  And so we homeschool! 

 

I also like sleeping in, seeing my kids, not fighting with car line, not worrying about homework, not worrying about teaching to the test or standardized testing, and being able to go on vacation when we want.  It's also a huge plus that we can get everything done during the day normally, so we can just enjoy being a family when my husband isn't working.

 

*Also, I'm a former public school teacher.  So I know nothing magical happens in the classroom.  I was a good public teacher and did meet the needs of my students, the best I could.  But when you have 35 kids in a class, it's impossible to tailor it perfectly for every single student, no matter how good of a teacher you are. 

Edited by kohlby
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you guys are awesome :-) Thanks for playing along with my question. I LOVE reading all of the responses! We're about to begin a "trial period" (aka I want to home school and my husband doesn't agree yet) so this also helps me get in the right frame of mind and to be ready for possible questions/issues/benefits.

 

Keep 'em coming! anyone else?

 

Anyone homeschooling an only child? That will be us...seems a lot of homeschool families have more than one child.

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Because we can.

I am fortunate enough to stay home and have the time/willingness to give my daughter the freedom to go where her heart takes her. She will be successful because she will be able to choose her path and fly towards her goals, not inch along with unnecessary baggage until she is deemed "prepared" to go out in the world. Ha!

The bigger questions is: Why WOULDN'T I homeschool?

Or! Have you turned the question on its heels and asked "Why did you choose public school for your child?" I guarantee most people never thought of it as a choice.

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Here's my newest aha moment. Why, when you homeschool, do people feel they have the right to question your child to "test" what they know?  and why DON'T they do that if you have a child in public school? Ridiculous.

 

In other news, I had a situation last night where I mentioned homeschooling to two friends. I was not prepared for how quickly they tried to talk me out of it and they instantly showed concern for his "socialization". Honestly it shocked me. I felt myself get very defensive until I just finally dropped it. I know folks have issues like this all the time - just didn't expect it from those friends. :-(

 

Stephanie

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Stephanie, there are ways to deal with the quizzing issue and non-supportive friends detailed here: http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/afaq6.html

 

As far as the socialization question goes - the next time someone asks you that, ask them how many times did they hear "We're not here to socialize!" when they went to school. Just sayin...

 

Warmly,
Dianna

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Just want to say - I'm new and I already love y'all! I've been reading the FAQs, old posts, etc. and it's incredibly helpful and inspiring! I'm feeling more excited now vs. overwhelmed so thanks.  B)

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Dianna hit the nail on the head! All day long at school my dd was in trouble for....TALKING to her friends! The nerve of her! 

 

No talking in the hall

No talking in line

No talking at your desk

No talking at lunch

Quiet in the library!

Save your questions for the end!

No talking in the bathroom, be out by the time I count down from 20

No talking during recess if you didn't finish your morning work

Silent bus today!

 

It's recess time! You have 10 minutes to talk, hurry up!

 

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That's exactly why my son is in trouble ALL the time! He even had a child tell him the other day that he wasn't invited to lunch with him when his dad was there because my he talks too much. Sorry - my son's verbal skills are off the charts and he likes to use them (like his mom) ;-) LOL

 

Stephanie

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you guys are awesome :-) Thanks for playing along with my question. I LOVE reading all of the responses! We're about to begin a "trial period" (aka I want to home school and my husband doesn't agree yet) so this also helps me get in the right frame of mind and to be ready for possible questions/issues/benefits.

 

Keep 'em coming! anyone else?

 

Anyone homeschooling an only child? That will be us...seems a lot of homeschool families have more than one child.

I will be homeschooling my only son. He is 4 now so have not officially registered.  I willnext year but have started educating him at home everyday. :)

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Several reasons - my husband was on second shift and wouldn't have been able to see our son (only one at the time) during the week once he started school. I was working as a school psychologist in our local schools and saw how much learning really happened (or didn't) in the classroom. Many times it wasn't the teacher's fault - it was all the paperwork, bureaucracy, and testing they had to work around in order to teach. Sometimes it was the teacher, though, like the one who punished children who were motivated enough to work ahead on a math assignment. She kept them inside during recess. Her reasoning? They didn't follow directions. You can bet those children "learned their place" and won't be motivated go beyond what's asked of them ever again. I could share many stories like this, but the main reason we homeschool is it's a lifestyle choice for us - we enjoy being around our children and learning with them.

 

Warmly,

Dianna

I love being around mine too! Might as well enjoy him while we can.  Hoping that this will  make our bond as a family stronger :)

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I'm new here and wanted to thank everyone for the info! I've learned so much from this message board and it's really helped the anxiety I had.

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Welcome to our community, Angela! Let us know if we can answer any questions you have as you begin your homeschooling journey!

 

Warmly,

Dianna

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I'm new here and wanted to thank everyone for the info! I've learned so much from this message board and it's really helped the anxiety I had.

 

You are not alone- I felt the same way but having joined this forum and meeting others who homeschool, I feel much better than I did when I first had the idea of home schooling.

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I to am new to home schooling.  I am the grandparents and guardian of two grandsons, one 14 who is autistic and ADHD and one 15 who has his challenges as well and is also ADHD.  They both have been bullied in the public schools with no real assistance from the school system.  We, my wife and I will give this a shot and the boys are really looking forward to this.  Thank you for your responses, makes me feel a little more at ease.

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Rickey, let us know if we can help you along the way.

 

Warmly,
Dianna

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We had talked about homeschooling when my oldest was in preschool.  We just had no idea how to go about it, and frankly were very intimidated.  That's one thing we would change if we had a time machine, but... c'est la vie...

 

Elementary school was tough for our oldest.  He didn't have many friends, but the kids were at least polite and courteous.  There was some teasing, but nothing out of the ordinary.  He was in the gifted program which gave him some flexibility to study things he really liked.  His grades were good...

 

Then middle school came, and those same kids who were polite and courteous turned nasty. (Really nasty.)  His 6th grade History teacher was showing movies like The Gladiator, 300 and Monty Python and the Holy Grail to her class (I love Monty Python, but I think the premise that it talks about medieval history is a pretty big stretch).  In 7th grade, the bullying got so bad and his grades were slipping so much that he didn't even finish out the school year.  The school never took any of our bullying complaints seriously anyway.  They "never saw anything" so it was just dismissed out-of-hand.  Over Christmas break, we purchased lots and lots and lots of different curriculum to try and dove in head-first.

 

When we started homeschooling, I discovered my child who was in the "gifted" program at school couldn't even tell me what an adjective was... or an adverb... or a preposition.  It was quite a shock!  I soon found out just how many "holes" he had in his education and was disgusted.  We decided that when fall began, our other two sons would be homeschooled as well.  

 

My youngest (5) has to be the one I am most nervous about teaching.  He will never have been in public school, so the burden of his ENTIRE education rests squarely on our shoulders.  It's a daunting proposition, but for as much as I am nervous, I am also excited.  We're looking forward to being able to spend more time together as a family (and not doing hours of pointless homework), to tailor our children's education to their interests (medieval weaponry and blacksmithing anyone?), and reinforce our family's values rather than have our children's education determined by the most up-to-date political claptrap of the day.

 

Rant over... sorry...   ^_^

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I'm sorry you son was bullied, I lived through that myself and almost committed suicide in middle school because of it. I vowed I'd never let my kid suffer like I did. Best of luck to you guys.

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My children have always been over scheduled with outside activities. (All my fault lol). My husband has his own small business and is frequently out of town and I'm a realtor (part time). We started with public school at home to allow them the chance to be children after the school day was done. My son is currently at York Prep in Rock Hill for the second year in the fall (10th grade). It was hard to send him, but he does better for someone else than he does me (school wise) and he missed sports, it was not the same playing when he was homeschooled. He felt out of the loop.

My daughter, a gymnast (with wild dreams), wouldn't go to brick and mortar if you paid her. We enjoy the freedom, she gets to be in the gym during the day, when most kids are at school. We do trips, museums, and it's a ton of fun. We changed over to, option 3 to give us more freedom, to allow her some say in the classes and to get away from something's we didn't agree with. We will have 16 days completed for the month of June and it has been the best 16 days of school ever! Don't get me wrong, somedays I would love to send her off, and when I feel the urge, she goes to Nana's!!

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We researched homeschooling when my oldest was born because we were zoned for horrible schools in FL. We moved here when he was 2 and decided to try the local school which has pretty good ratings. Halfway through kindergarten, we were encouraged to have him evaluated for ADHD. We ended up with a medicated 6 year-old who wouldn't eat and couldn't sleep. He started showing signs of anxiety and was chewing his fingers til they bled. We got referred to a psychiatrist and a behavioral therapist. By the end of second grade we were DONE. In 2012/2013 I brought him home for 3rd grade, threw the meds in the trash and have never looked back. Turns out all the anxiety was a side effect of the ADHD medication. Now I get to have all of my son. Not just the part that was crying in the morning because he didn't want to go to school. Not the part that got off the bus exhausted and still had 2 hours of homework to do (in 2nd grade!) He has regained his love of learning. His younger brother joined us at home after Kindergarten. We just finished our first year with both of them home (my second year with oldest son). We say we will take it a year at a time but I don't see them ever going back. We have already started 2nd and 5th grade.  :D

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