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karenmtosh@gmail.com

Public School Hybrid

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karenmtosh@gmail.com

I live on Daniel Island in Berkeley County and I love many aspects of my local public school, but there are also some things that frustrate me about institutional learning.  I also love being with my two boys who are in first and fourth grade, and we are all missing out on all of the amazing learning, traveling, real world experiences, relational building and moral lessons etc. etc. etc that happen when you homeschool.  My husband is very happy with Daniel Island School, and the kids are doing great, so his perspective is to leave education to the professionals and if its working well, why would you change it?  

 

What I would LOVE is a public school/online public school hybrid, but Marty French the principal of DIS who kindly met with me communicated that unfortunately, that is not possible at this time due to funding constraints.  Sooooo...I am looking for ways to find compromise...I am meeting with the assistant principal today to see if hopefully they will be willing to work with me.  Perhaps we could do the K12 online program and with the interscholastic activity bill my kids could participate in music or other enrichment activities at the school, but I am unaware if those "interscholastic activities" can be during the school day, or only after school.  I am also considering doing public school first semester and an online public school the second semester.  Any ideas, thoughts or suggestions would, be greatly appreciated!!

 

Thank you in advance!! :D

 

 

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Laura Launius

I don't know about a public school hybrid option but I am aware of families that have developed a cooperative agreement with private schools. 

 

Unfortunately you would not be able to utilize the Equal Access Bill until you have homeschooled for a full year.  In addition, at least from our school district, the information is as follows:

            Interscholastic activities are those that...carry no academic credit, do not fall within the scope of the regular curriculum, or have a requirement for enrollment in a class during the regular academic day at the school.

 

With that said, there have been times where families have been allowed to access things like Robotics Teams, Chess club, etc. prior to the Equal Access Bill but it has varied by district. 

 

At the ages of your children and with your statement. "there are also some things that frustrate me about institutional learning.  I also love being with my two boys who are in first and fourth grade, and we are all missing out on all of the amazing learning, traveling, real world experiences, relational building and moral lessons etc. etc. etc that happen when you homeschool"  I guess I wonder if you would really be happy with an on-line option.  While I've never considered it for my family, those that I know who use it have indicated that it is still very much public school and that you are still regulated by the school as to what constitutes "school", what asssignments are required, etc.

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Dianna

I guess I wonder if you would really be happy with an on-line option.  While I've never considered it for my family, those that I know who use it have indicated that it is still very much public school and that you are still regulated by the school as to what constitutes "school", what asssignments are required, etc.

 

And you have to follow their schedule. Virtual school families who go on my multi-day trips with me are often in their hotel rooms in the evenings catching up on their work because if they miss a few days it's next to impossible to catch up. Attendance is rigid.

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kohlby

I know of some who do hybrid homeschooling with private schools, but not with public. With public, you can do extracurricular, but that's just about it. If you do a public school at home option, it's not going to be as flexible as you likely hope. If you like that curriculum, another option is paying for the materials they use and then doing it on your own. I'd suggest looking into co-ops and homeschool classes in your area. It likely would be easier to do homeschooling with some more formal activities/classes added in than the reverse. And, homeschool activities/classes tend to be more flexible if you end up missing some.

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karenmtosh@gmail.com

Thank you SO MUCH for your perspectives!!  This has certainly been a journey for me...so, to offer a little more perspective, I survived a traumatic brain injury almost three years ago.  I was a highly organized mom/sales person before my accident, and this brain injury has forced me to SLOW DOWN as I can no longer effectively multitask, and do things that we take for granted every day that our frontal lobes do.  I have ADD now (I was the opposite before my accident) and am VERY right brained now, but am working to engage those left brained tools that are so important to being able to get tasks accomplished.  Needless to say, our world has taken a big turn, and understandably, my husband is concerned that with my current differences, we would be compromising our children's education...sigh...the difficult part is that this is one of those things that you don't know what you don't know, so we would have to try it just to see if I could do it effectively, but my husband has valid fears...the online public school option seems like it might offer me the structure and guidance that my brain needs to make the transition a little smoother...if anyone has anymore thoughts or suggestions, I am open...thank you kindly to those who have responded ;)  

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kohlby

Would your husband be willing to be actively involved?  That way, you two could work together and he could make up for any struggles you have.  Homeschooling doesn't need to be a M-F 8-3 type thing either.  So he could help out more when he's not at work as well.  Are you able to help your children with their homework?  If so, you likely could handle this too - though you may want to use more structured curriculums at least at the start so you know what to do next.  We have to keep a log book so that helps keep me organized.  My eldest prefers to work independently too, so that helps.  He doesn't do much online learning, but there are a lot of online programs if you think that would help you.  First grade is extremely low stakes.  It took all of 60-90 minutes to get the core subjects in.  Even 4th grade was under 3 hours.    Using K12 can actually take more organization.  They tell you what to do but there's less wiggle room and you must meet the deadlines.  It also takes more time than most traditional homeschoolers spend - meaning more time for you to stay focused.

I would suggest finding a local homeschool group and asking if you could come to one of their park days or other relaxed meet-ups.  You could talk to many homeschool parents there and learn about many different styles.  That support is important too - so if you do struggle, you have people you can ask for help.

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karenmtosh@gmail.com

VERY valuable information Kohlby!!  THANK YOU for taking the time!!

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Stephanie Schultz

I just want to throw another option out there. Have you looked into Abeka DVDs? They have many different options. You can do just DVDs either accredited or independent. You can do partial DVDs and the rest parent led, or you can do all parent led. There are two different sites to look at. For the DVDs it's called a Abeka Academy. For just parent led it's called Abeka book.

I have not personally tried their DVDs, but I have heard good things about them. I have also heard they can be long because it's like your child is in an actual class room setting.

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Laura Launius

Thank you SO MUCH for your perspectives!!  This has certainly been a journey for me...so, to offer a little more perspective, I survived a traumatic brain injury almost three years ago.  I was a highly organized mom/sales person before my accident, and this brain injury has forced me to SLOW DOWN as I can no longer effectively multitask, and do things that we take for granted every day that our frontal lobes do.  I have ADD now (I was the opposite before my accident) and am VERY right brained now, but am working to engage those left brained tools that are so important to being able to get tasks accomplished.  Needless to say, our world has taken a big turn, and understandably, my husband is concerned that with my current differences, we would be compromising our children's education...sigh...the difficult part is that this is one of those things that you don't know what you don't know, so we would have to try it just to see if I could do it effectively, but my husband has valid fears...the online public school option seems like it might offer me the structure and guidance that my brain needs to make the transition a little smoother...if anyone has anymore thoughts or suggestions, I am open...thank you kindly to those who have responded ;)  

Ok, I've been thinking about this.  I had a head injury a couple years ago -- luckily I only had "symptoms" for a couple months but it did impact the way we homeschool -- and I'm blessed to have four children with varying ADD/ADHD so I get the problems associated with it.  As I thought about your situation I don't think it has to be something like a virtual school.  There are many, many programs available for homeschooling that helps to organize where you're going.  Many of the curriculums that are now available come w/ a schedule grid or are set up for anywhere from 2-5 lessons a week.  So it really depends upon what style of homeschooling you would want.  There are products that are more traditional like Bob Jones, Abeka, Christian Light Education, Saxon, Alpha Omega (Lifepacs, Horizons, etc.), Teaching Textbooks, etc..  There are materials that are more Charlotte Mason inspired like Queen's Homeschool, Living Education, Simply Charlotte Mason, or Heart of Dakota.  You also have products that are more Classical Peace Hill Press, Memoria Press, etc. And ones like Sonlight, Winter Promise, etc. that are built around living books. 

 

To begin it might be easier to pick a language arts and math program that you like in your boys grade level -- these products are typically set up 1 lesson a day :)  I typically do a reading program still in first grade but by 4th we're just reading books and discussing -- but every homeschool family is different.  Then for Social Studies/History and Science I would combine them with one product that allows you that interaction time where you are reading some aloud, making a notebook page, doing projects, experiments, etc. together --- keep in mind with first and 4th these subjects don't have to be every day and obviously you'll expect more from your 4th grader than 1st grader but you can keep them together on the same topic.   At the age of your boys you can do "book school" in a couple hours tops and then you have time for field trips, nature walks, park days, music lessons, etc. 

 

I would venture to bet that if you find a homeschool group in your area you would find people willing to share what they use and how they set things up.  I think most of us that have been doing this a long time gladly open our homes and hearts to new moms just coming into this journey.   

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