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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/09/2013 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Weekends, summers, midnight star-gazing and interesting discussions, catching an unplanned TV special on the Civil War, or NASA, or black holes, or the Great Depression, or whatever, counts. If you're on a trip and listen to audiobooks in the car, that counts as reading/literature. If the books touch on science or social studies topics, then they count as that, too. Learning happens 24/7, 365 days a year. Your challenge is to remember to document it for 180 days out of those 365, starting on June 1, and running through May 31 (if you're a member of my 3rd option association). Warmly, Dianna
  2. 4 points
    Dianna hit the nail on the head! All day long at school my dd was in trouble for....TALKING to her friends! The nerve of her! No talking in the hall No talking in line No talking at your desk No talking at lunch Quiet in the library! Save your questions for the end! No talking in the bathroom, be out by the time I count down from 20 No talking during recess if you didn't finish your morning work Silent bus today! It's recess time! You have 10 minutes to talk, hurry up!
  3. 4 points
    Stephanie, there are ways to deal with the quizzing issue and non-supportive friends detailed here: http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/afaq6.html As far as the socialization question goes - the next time someone asks you that, ask them how many times did they hear "We're not here to socialize!" when they went to school. Just sayin... Warmly, Dianna
  4. 4 points
    Education. I can give my children a better education than the public/private schools can thanks to being able to tailor their curriculum to their needs/interests/strengths. The elem school near us is one of the best in the state, even recognized nationally, but that doesn't mean it's the best for my kids when I can homeschool them. I am glad we have such a good school near us though, for those who do not homeschool. That's the short answer. I stumbled into homeschooling when I realized that public kindy wouldn't work for my eldest wiggly boy who learned out of order. He was far ahead in application and analysis, but way behind in memorization. He wasn't a checklist kid. I didn't send any to pre-k since those programs weren't play-based enough. (Which is also why I'm not a fan of public kindy). As he's progressed, his behavior has changed to a point where he could handle public school - but his education needs have become much, much harder to meet. And so we homeschool! I also like sleeping in, seeing my kids, not fighting with car line, not worrying about homework, not worrying about teaching to the test or standardized testing, and being able to go on vacation when we want. It's also a huge plus that we can get everything done during the day normally, so we can just enjoy being a family when my husband isn't working. *Also, I'm a former public school teacher. So I know nothing magical happens in the classroom. I was a good public teacher and did meet the needs of my students, the best I could. But when you have 35 kids in a class, it's impossible to tailor it perfectly for every single student, no matter how good of a teacher you are.
  5. 4 points
    Welcome, Melissa G! I get the anxious thing! (I'm sure I"m not alone too!) I just pulled my oldest out of 7th grade public school in the middle of the school year and started homeschooling him in January. It sounds like we have a similar situation. He went from being a child who packed his own backpack full of books, crayons and paper just to sign up for preschool to a sullen, angry, disillusioned 12 year old. He's never been happier since we pulled him out. It hasn't been easy - we have days where we just can't stand to be in the same room as one another... but for the most part, I've gotten a lot more hugs, kisses and "I love you"s and he's beginning to love learning again. It sounds like you already have a great setup, and you've already been homeschooling without even knowing it! Getting started is scary, (I personally am obsessed with researching curriculum) but the thing I love most about homeshooling, is if you try something and it doesn't work, it's easy enough to switch! Knowing how your kids like to learn is important (kinesthetic, visual, auditory, etc) and there are sooooo many choices (which is why I'm obsessive about curriculum) that it will make your head spin. Personally, I found reading reviews to be just as confusing as helpful, because what works for one family won't necessarily work for another. If you're already taking care of all those animals and running your own homestead, being organized must be second-nature to you, and that will help. Keeping track of lessons, recordkeeping, etc. all takes time and organization. And I know you're probably thinking - I'm swamped already - but when you're not having to deal with the issues public school drops on your doorstep, you'll be amazed at the extra time you get! (Don't know what kind of schedule your son had, but mine was having between 2-3 hours of homework every night - even on weekends. Not dealing with that every day gave me plenty of time for lesson-planning and grading papers.) I will also be homeschooling a kindergartener this fall (as well as a 5th grader too). Frankly, the one that scares me the most is the kindergartener - making sure he has a good foundation and praying daily that I will be up to the task! I know one of the hardest things my 7th grader had adjusting to was his schedule at home. He was under the impression that he would send a set amount of time on each subject every day -- just like public school. So, if at the end of 45 minutes, he hadn't finished an assignment - he'd just quit (even if he'd spent 15 minutes staring out his window at the bird feeders). I explained the freedom he had now that he was at home - if he didn't have any trouble understanding the work and could finish it in 20 minutes - GREAT! If not, we could take and hour to really get it down.. and if we were frustrated beyond belief - we could skip it til tomorrow. Setting goals and accomplishing them has been our main focus -- not making sure he's busy for 45 minutes in each subject each day. Some days we do math first, some days history. Some days its a struggle to get him to do anything, other days he can't wait to read a particular history assignment or do a particular science experiment. One day a time (or sometimes one hour at a time - LOL!) has become my mantra... Sorry that I've rambled... I'm on a super-caffeine rush today
  6. 3 points
    We are in Mt. Pleasant as well. 5 kids- 19 yr at C of C, 17yr girl, 13 girl, 8 girl, 2 boy
  7. 3 points
    I to am new to home schooling. I am the grandparents and guardian of two grandsons, one 14 who is autistic and ADHD and one 15 who has his challenges as well and is also ADHD. They both have been bullied in the public schools with no real assistance from the school system. We, my wife and I will give this a shot and the boys are really looking forward to this. Thank you for your responses, makes me feel a little more at ease.
  8. 3 points
    Yes. All learning counts. It's important for our children to understand that learning happens all the time - not only when they're on a schedule, not only from textbooks and workbooks, not only between the hours of 8:00 am and 3:00 pm on Mondays-Fridays, August-May. If they truly understand that, they'll be in learning mode the rest of their lives - always curious, always absorbing new ideas and information. Warmly, Dianna
  9. 3 points
    And it doesn't have to be in a neat 9-3 school day either! My husband wants in on this, and he already reads with them each night and like to do projects after dinner. Building an RC car with Daddy, while he teaches them about friction, after dinner, totally counts. I'm planning to save a lot of the science and some of the reading stuff for Daddy!
  10. 3 points
    Angela, Options 2 and 3 both refer to associations, and both provide the same legal avenue for us homeschool without having to register with the school district. Option 3 was introduced (and passed) in 1996 by homeschooling moms because Option 2 was too restrictive (provided for only one association, so we didn't have any choice other than registering through the local school district). The vast majority of SC homeschooling families use Option 3 associations because most don't require testing, are budget-friendly, and allow parents to choose their own curriculum without having to approve it. Also, Option 3 mandates that parents maintain their own records, so there's less paperwork, which leaves more time to focus on learning. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions. Warmly, Dianna
  11. 3 points
    I'm new here and wanted to thank everyone for the info! I've learned so much from this message board and it's really helped the anxiety I had.
  12. 3 points
    Okay - I'll throw in my hat here. I'm one of those who did start early, at 15. Texas Academy of Math and Sciences at University of North Texas. Benefit - there were 2 years of students there, 200 Jr and 200 Sr living in a dorm, so I wasn't totally with just 18 year olds in class. Graduated "high school" with 77 semester hours, and no high school classes for Jr and Sr year (all college, and not easy ones). B.S. at 19, M.S. from U of Michigan with DOE Fellowship paying for grad school at 21. Imagine being in grad school, and your class mates having to make sure wherever they were going that you were able to actually get in! If I went, they had to chose carefully. Worked as Radiological Engineer at SRS at 21. Do I regret it - NO! Because the school district I was in didn't allow me to advance. In 10th grade I had finished their math department. They wouldn't let me dual enroll. Freshman and Sophomore English were a repeat of the same books I had read in middle school in Michigan (military dad so we moved). And yet....I do NOT want my kids to go off early. Eldest will go off a few months before he turns 18 (current plan - rising 9th now). He will probably dual enroll some classes his last 3 semesters after he turns 16. But that will be to allow him to have more free and fun time in college. I never took fun classes. I never explored other options. I want them to experience a little more of life than I had the opportunity to do. So, fun jobs, summer camps, internships, volunteer work, teaching at the karate dojo (which he loves). I did raise him up to 8th this year, but with an end of Sept b-day it wasn't a big deal. In Ohio where he was born he would be finishing 8th this year. I debated doing the TIPS program with DS, and then didn't. I was too frustrated with the smart kid labels as a child that I guess I veered the other direction!
  13. 3 points
    That's the great thing about homeschooling is that learning doesn't have to fit in a box Bike riding, swimming, bowling, litle league, youth basketball, gymnastics and dance classes --- that's all PE for us. Music lessons, art classes, etc. all count as part of school too. The nice thing also is that by high school those same things can be part of your electives
  14. 3 points
    I strongly agree with this. I'm not advancing my son rapidly through grade levels. He's starting 7th grade next year and I'm deciding whether I'll count algebra as a high school credit, but I'm leaning towards not. It'll go on his hs transcript as courses taken before hs, but I don't expect I'll give a grade. There's SO MUCH available, we're not going to run out of material. Midlands Tech doesn't want students under 16 in classes. I might be able to swing it earlier but I think USC would be more likely for dual enrollment. But that's really expensive as well. MIT Open Courses and Coesura are possibilities. If he pushes to go to college early, you can always accelerate. It's tougher to drop back grades though. You may want to do some reading on the Well Trained Mind forums Accelerated Board as well. But unless your son is racing forward, dragging you behind, I wouldn't try to get him in high school early. You probably will want him to participate in talent searches... Duke TIP, NUMATS, and CTY are all programs that are available. USC has a PUPS program for kids in TIP. Start slow.
  15. 3 points
    Hi Kristina; Welcome! I can't speak to pulling out of school but I can tell you that I had one wiggly, extremely gifted, but w/ ADD-inattentive, dyslexic and dysgraphic little guy go through the public school system. But, we are talking about a different time - before Common Core -- and when parents were still invited into the public school classroom to help out. The problem for my ds was that he was bored - he hated writing - knew the material presented through 4th grade as a K5er. The schools solution was to bump him up a year, have me send in extra material, have him help tutor the other kids, send him on errands, never take away PE or recess (then they still had 2 recesses) and let him do a lot of his work orally. Middle School and High School were different birds and we had to figure out ways for him to get the material to them. All that to say, if public school is what you want, it can be done, but it will take a lot of work on your part. For what it's worth the ds I'm referring to graduated high school as an honor student and went on to graduate USC-Columbia. Jump ahead and I made the decision to home-school the other three. In that mix I have two more of the same along w/ one of them having major health problems. When my boys are under the age of 9 I do the majority of their school work sitting beside them helping them to stay focused. We do short lessons, we don't do tons of review or busy work - we cover the subjects making sure that they know the material but no boring them w/ a drill and kill attitude. They do handwriting but again we follow a quick and simple method so it's no more than maybe 5 mins and they write some of their math but other parts they simply tell me the answer. Soc Studies/History we cover history beginning w/ Ancient bec for my boys there is nothing is great as learning about the Egyptians and mummies I throw Soc Studies in by discussing monthly holidays or community helpers, people of noteworthiness , etc. but I don't spend a ton of time on it. For science we read and explore nature and do experiments -- bec my boys tend to be hands-on and benefit from touching, seeing and exploring. Spelling we use magnets and I don't stress about spelling if a child doesn't have the skills until later. Your ds is still young - he's curious and wants to be engaged in learning not sitting in a classroom -- that's understandable. As for your dh's concern -- look at his reasoning and then see what info you can help him to see a counter argument in favor of hsing v the traditional classroom. It took some doing for me to convince dh, but he's seen the fruits of my labor w/ our kids. Will it always be easy? NO! Do the blessings outweigh the struggles -- I can honestly say YES!
  16. 2 points
    Registration is open for The Orchestra Rocks! The South Carolina Philharmonic partners with Carnegie Hall’s Weill Institute in February 2015 to present an interactive concert experience for K-5 students. Through the concert repertoire, hands-on activities, and a culminating performance with the South Carolina Philharmonic, home school students will explore rhythm, pulse, and groove, drawing on selected orchestra repertoire. Link Up provides a unique opportunity to connect learning with a live performance. The optional curriculum is available now and includes selections from Tchaikovsky, Orff, Holst, and more. Contact Kim Williams, SCP Education Director, for information: (803) 767-5102 or email kim@scphilharmonic.com. Further information about the South Carolina Philharmonic’s educational opportunities is available at: http://www.scphilharmonic.com/educationalprograms.aspx.
  17. 2 points
    Labors Rose Hill Plantation State Historic Site This FREE program will focus on the types of daily work necessary to run an 1800s Upstate plantation. Through interactive exhibits such as candle making, brickmaking, gardening and food preparation, we will examine some of the duties of the enslaved African-Americans. The program is ongoing from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Special performances by Kitty Wilson-Evans, Tyrie Rowell and Dontavius Williams will take place throughout the morning. Through specific characters, they will bring to life the stories of household slaves, skilled laborers and those who toiled in the fields. Extra option: Special tours* of the Gist home will be offered at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Tours will emphasize the duties performed by enslaved people who worked inside the Gist mansion. (*fee required) Rose Hill Plantation, 2677 Sardis Rd., Union, SC, 29379 www.southcarolinaparks.com/rosehill ph. 864-427-5966 E-mail: rosehill@scpt.com
  18. 2 points
    There is a website www.allinonehomeschool.com Easy Peasy. We are doing zoology for science and ancient history. It is broken up with L for lower grades and M for middle school. Each week I look through the content for both and pick what we will do, copy and paste it to a word document and print it out for our plan. The links on her site take them to the reading, games and sometime quizzes or worksheets you can print. We use you tube, ETV and National Geographic to find a documentary to go with the lesson one day history the next science and watch them during our lunch if we are indoors or at bedtime. (If it's long we do it in 2 days) I am using K12 independent study for Literature, Math and Spanish. We use Brain Pop too.
  19. 2 points
    We're in Mt Pleasant, too. One girl - age 9.
  20. 2 points
    Hi Melissa, In my opinion, I think that you should focus on providing more indepth learning experiences for him rather than advancing grade levels. As homeschoolers, you have the flexibility to teach him at his level, wherever it is. If he really wants to graduate early and go to college early, then you can, of course, have him take the SAT or ACT and talk to the colleges about him enrolling at a younger-than-typical age. But if it were my child, and I wanted him to be a child (as you stated above), I would use this time to provide all the fun and indepth learning experiences as possible while he's still at home. Learning is a journey, not a race, and college is a totally different social scene. Over my 20+ years of homeschooling, all of the parents and students I've known personally (public, private, and homeschool) who've graduated and entered college early have regretted it. I'm sure there are others who didn't/don't regret it, but I don't know them personally. You don't have to prove to anyone (nosy neighbors or school officials or other parents or whomever....) how smart your son is, so the pressure is off. I wouldn't even worry about credits until high school. If he takes Algebra 2 or Calculus or Spanish 3 in the 9th grade, and higher level maths and Spanish each year after that, list those courses on his transcript. College admission officials will know he had Algebra 1, Spanish 1 and 2, etc., before that. You don't have to list tons of credits on a transcript to prove your son is smart - his SAT/ACT scores, foreign language college placement exams, and interviews will establish that, without making it seem that your son was so focused on academics that there was nothing else in his life. (If that makes sense.) If he decides to enter college at a younger grade, then it would be best to talk to any colleges he's interested in to see what their requirements are for younger students, etc. Then you'd have to list courses/credits, etc., on his transcript to show that he's met their requirements. But if he decides to enter college with his age-mates, then the pressure is off, and he's free to learn at will. You can worry about paperwork and documenting coursework when he enters 9th grade. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions. Warmly, Dianna
  21. 2 points
    Melissa, you're already homeschooling with all the learning that's going on at your house. Just build on that. You don't have to stick to a school schedule - learning happens on the weekends, evenings, during the summer, during vacations, etc., so you can homeschool around your work schedule. For answers to frequently asked questions, see my FAQs at http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/afaq.html If you have any other questions after reading through those, let me know. For more in-depth information, a description of different methods, typical days, favorite resources, and advice from hundreds of homeschooling parents who answered my surveys, see my guide: http://amzn.to/Mj41rh Warmly, Dianna
  22. 2 points
    We live in Conway; this is our second year of homeschooling! I'd love to help you get acquainted in any way I can.
  23. 2 points
    Stephanie, I've had many registrations from families this month, so you're not alone in wanting to begin homeschooling mid-year. The best way to do it would be to register with an association first, then wait for your your membership to be finalized. Then you can take your membership letter to the school and officially withdraw him. (If you try to withdraw him before you're legally covered to homeschool, then you may run into truancy issues.) After you get him home, consider doing activities that would re-ignite his love for learning (reading good books together, field trips, museum and zoo visits, documentaries, experiments, etc.). All of that is learning, and all of it counts. There's a lot more information available in my FAQs at http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/afaq.html and in the messages posted here. Let me know if you have any other questions. Warmly, Dianna
  24. 2 points
    I agree that college is not the only choice after high school. It was most definitely my son's choice. However it doesn't look to be the path my daughter hopes to take. She is currently in 10th grade. I have begun to think about how to prepare her for life after high school. Currently she is trying to get a part time job. I think it will be very important for her to develop a resume and gain work experience while she is in high school. I also hope to be able to give her some type of aptitude test and the opportunity to shadow people in different jobs that might interest her,
  25. 2 points
    I teach math part time at Midlands Tech. I don't log on here regularly, but send me a message to remind me to check back if you have questions & I'll come back and post more promptly Depending on which college you're working with, the courses that are "developmental" (below 101) may have different requirements and course numbers (I also taught at OCTC before having my son.) Dual credit gets interesting at the technical colleges. Midlands doesn't want students on campus who are under 16. I don't know how I'd go about doing dual credit if I had my son taking courses. I'd probably just sign him up for the classes at MTC and then give him the grade on the high school transcript with the indication (taken at xxx college). All 16 technical colleges in SC have the same course descriptions for content courses. That's designed by the State Tech board. MAT 101 - Beginning Algebra - basically this is roughly a high school Algebra I course (although it sounds like a high school alg I course will cover a bit more material than we do in 101). We end with factoring quadratics and solving quadratics by factoring (along the way we graph lines, solve linear equations, work with polynomial arithmetic). MAT 102 - Intermediate Algebra - basically a high school Algebra II class. Covers systems of equations, rationals, radicals, and all quadratics and graphing. Neither of these courses transfer to any public 4-year college. They are considered remedial for college. They don't count towards the AA or AS degree at the two-year schools either. After MAT 102, students can take courses that DO transfer to 4 year schools. MAT 120 (stats) // MAT 110 (college algebra) // MAT 122 (finite math) Degree and interest determines which course should be taken. MAT 110 will be the toughest because students can continue on from it. It's partially a precalc course but it doesn't have trig. Trig is MAT 111. Calculus is MAT 130 (can take from 110 - no trig included and a terminal course. This is for business students typically) Calculus I is MAT 140 - trig is a prereq. You can look at any 4 year college's articulation agreement and it will show what courses transfer from the tech schools. Developmental math is prealgebra. A student shouldn't get high school credit for it. At Midlands, the testing center gives exemption exams the first 3 days of the semester for math courses. A student takes the final exam for the course and if they pass, they can register for the next course. I've taught at the technical college since 1996. A student should NOT skip into a later math class. The placement test used (COMPASS) is pretty accurate. It is possible sometimes for a student to retest, but a student should follow where they placed. Typically you can give a year's high school credit for a semester's college class. Do be aware that the courses move QUICKLY and there are no excused absences or make ups. I wouldn't recommend too many courses at the college for a first attempt. Some colleges count W's as Fs when looking at transcripts for acceptance. Summer school is a possibility for fitting in extra courses if needed. Happy to answer questions (I'm procrastinating getting ready for my classes that start Tuesday - MAT 101 and 102!)
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