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  1. Dianna

    Dianna

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  2. Jeshua

    Jeshua

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  3. Katy

    Katy

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    minecraft3141

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/09/2013 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    Hi all! I am brand new to this site, and I am so relieved to find out the feeling of being overwhelmed is completely normal! (I thought perhaps I should post, as I went on a "like" spree, on almost every response here! lol) My son is 4, will turn 5 in January, and I really feel that homeschooling is best for him. After finding this site, and Carolina Homeschooler association, I really feel much more confident in my decision, and myself! (I was really having feelings of thinking there's no way I'm "smart enough" to completely-from-day-1 homeschool, and how-in-the-world-am-I-ever-gonna-teach-myself-to-know-what-paid-teachers-know...but after reading all the info on this site, and reading posts like this one, it really, truly helps! I'm sorry to hijack this thread, I apologize, I am just so excited, and relieved to finally feel like I'm on the right track, both for me and my family.
  2. 3 points
    I jot my plans down in a student planner. (Or fill in as they get done). Like Dianna mentioned, attendance gets done easily this way too. It's very simple. I use a student planner because I want my children to take some control of their education and it's helpful if they can write things in too. I like the weekly/monthy ones from Blue Sky. For a portfolio, you just need some samples of the work. Not all - just some. You can put in a few photos of projects/field trips if you wish. Or lists of books read, etc. It's up to you! You do not need to do standardized tests under most option 3 groups. (Though I read one group that did have it at one time - but that's very rare. Just don't pick one that requires it!) No professional evaluation is needed under option 3 either. I do write up some sort of evaluation of student progress twice a year and stick it into the portfolio. This can be a report card or just a summary. As for what the state "accepts," the state doesn't look for specifics of how we kept records, and in most cases - will never ask to see our records! Still keep them, as it is the law and it's best to be covered just in case.
  3. 3 points
    There are different ways to document educational activities, attendance, keep samples for a portfolio, etc. Once your membership is completed, you'll have access to my members area and there are forms you can download to keep track. (Or you can develop your own system.) When you get a chance, read through my Record-Keeping & Testing FAQs here: http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/homeschool-faqs/record-keeping-testing/ Under Option 3 in SC, you don't have test or submit test scores. It's completely normal to be overwhelmed and scared at first, but it does get better. I think you'll feel better after you read my FAQs (the one I linked above, and also my Beginning Homeschooling FAQ here: http://www.carolinahomeschooler.com/homeschool-faqs/ Reading through all of them is helpful, but those two will probably help the most right now. Let me know if you have any other questions. Warmly, Dianna
  4. 2 points
    I am currently homeschooling my 8 year old son (and this is my first time homeschooling!!). I am looking for other families that have children around the same age that live in/near Summerville.
  5. 2 points
    My husband challenged me to write for NaNoWriMo. I did not find out about it until Nov. 4, 2011 so I started out the challenge behind. When I wrote for NaNoWriMo the first time I had a hard time not rewriting every few paragraphs until I realized that I would never get anywhere if I continued going back and rewriting everything over and over again. So I forced myself to correct nothing; to not go back and read anything, just keep pushing on. I told myself it was not about writing the perfect story it was about creating a completed story. I wrote it on an iPad with a keyboard. I had over 50,000 words by Nov. 25th and I finished the novel in three months. I had two editors and kept them both busy. After editing my final word count was 198,671. Yes, it was ugly to hand over to the first editor, [who was my husband so it was not that hard (embarrassing) to hand it over] but I had a complete story and that felt way better than an unfinished perfect story no one would ever see. I wrote a second book during the summer camp and by day 31, I had 99,000 plus words. So my advice is to lock up that inner editor as she is an obstacle, inhibiting your writing, not perfecting it. And you can always let her out after the creating part is finished. [Then no one has to see the ugly unedited version beside yourself.] Have a lovely day!
  6. 2 points
    I live in Lancaster - just down the road from you! I will plan a Carolina Homeschooler member meet-up in the Lancaster area soon. I have a camping trip/Art in the Park this weekend, then things should slow down enough for me to plan more meet-ups. Keep an eye on the member newsletter for announcements. Warmly, Dianna
  7. 2 points
    I keep reading about documenting the days. Everyone seems to have a different opinion on documenting, what does the state accept as documentation? Do I just jot down what we do, keep the worksheets from each day, keep all tickets from events and take pictures? Not sure what to do. I read that in SC we have to submit test scores, and/or professional evaluation of student progress. How would I go about doing this? Is it normal to feel totally scared your not doing enough at the beginning? Will it get better?
  8. 2 points
    Thought some parents might be interested in this game for children to practice learning the periodic table. http://teachbesideme.com/periodic-table-battleship/
  9. 2 points
    Beth, We made the move from upstate NY (Binghamton) to SC (Richburg) three years ago. Ours are now graduated but if I can be of any help, feel free to zap a note. Or if you are simply struggling with the culture change , I'd be glad to be a listening ear. billiejoyoumans@gmail.com
  10. 2 points
    If you know anyone who needs 10th grade A Beka books, they are free. I don't resell them. They are all in like new shape. Comes with video guides too. Just message me if interested.
  11. 2 points
    There is a Facebook group called Upstate SC Tween and Teen Homeschoolers that does events for older homeschoolers in Greenville area. Some events are just for teens/Tweens, some also have younger kids. They have game nights, hang outs at Starbucks or Panera Bread etc.
  12. 2 points
    Danielle, I am the daughter of a school teacher. My degree is in early childhood education. My parents were very much against my decision to homeschool. At one point they even said "you need to put those kids in school where they belong." And at some point I lovingly told them that they had their chance to raise their kids and this it my chance to raise mine. They kept the comments to themselves from then on. But now, they have done a 360 degree turn around. They have access to the grandkids 24/7. They see that although my kids are educated differently than I was they are still learning at similar rates to other kids they know. They also see that my kids have more time to dive into the things that interest them. My mom went to Italy with us when we went with Dianna's group. She is seeing first hand what our learning looks like verses what had always had to happen in "her classroom". It won't happen overnight but those people who are making noise in your life will be able to see that it is working. Not always easy but so wort it!
  13. 2 points
    Hi Danielle, I'm sorry you're having problems with your family. The main strategy described in the FAQ is not to get them to read anything - it's to lay it out there that unless they've put in the same time and effort to research homeschooling that you have, they really don't have a right to question or criticize you. The expectation is that they won't read what you've listed for them, and therefore you won't have to deal with their negative biases and issues. But you'll have to follow the strategy and offer a list of resources, then stop any conversations and debates about your homeschooling as soon as they start. "Oh, did you read the articles, websites, books, magazines... whatever... I mentioned? No? Oh, well, read them soon so we can debate - I'd hate to win just because you haven't learned what it's really all about!" Then change the subject. If they keep stating their opinions, just reply... "Yeah... that's a common myth! I'm so glad the reality is different. So what good movies have you seen lately?" More comebacks: "Yeah, a lot of people think that until they find out the facts." (Then change the subject by asking about something they're interested in.) "I thought that, too, until I talked to real homeschoolers." (Then change the subject by asking about something they're interested in.) "That's one of the most common myths - it's not surprising you've heard that one!" (Then change the subject by asking about something they're interested in.) Whatever they say, come back with the fact that they're wrong, but you'll excuse them because they haven't taken the time to research the facts, but you won't engage with them or defend your decision to them. You don't have to defend your homeschooling to anyone. They'll never believe you until they see it for themselves. (And they usually eventually become supportive when they see how well the children are doing. When grandparents and other family members join me on my trips, they frequently tell me how they weren't supportive at first, but how much they see the benefits and have completely turned around.) I hope this makes sense. Warmly, Dianna
  14. 2 points
    I just wanted to add that you can use BrainPop Jr. (K-2 version) for free in South Carolina, from home, through your public library. Contact your local library and ask for this year's Discus password to log in.
  15. 2 points
    Welcome to homeschooling! I'm copying and pasting from my membership page to give you more complete answers: Do you require us to mail our records to you? No. The law mandates that parents/guardians maintain their own homeschool records. However, Carolina Homeschooler reserves the right to request copies of your records if an audit is requested by any SC agency (DSS, DJJ, Department of Education, etc.). In this case, you must mail a copy of your records within three days of receiving my request. Do we have to participate in any of your activities? No, all of our activities are optional. Our goal is to enhance your homeschool experience, not add more requirements and stress. Feel free to join in as many activities as you want, and leave the rest. You asked about curriculum approval and testing: Do you require textbooks? Do you approve curriculum? Do you require standardized testing? No, I don't require textbooks, approve your curriculum, or require testing. My experience as a school psychologist (and as a parent with over 20 years of homeschooling experience) has shown me that learning happens all the time, with a breadth and depth that can't be confined solely to textbooks or accurately measured by the narrow focus of standardized tests. Please feel free to use resources and assessment methods that best meet the needs of your family. You asked about fundraising. I don't do the typical sales-type fundraising. My fundraising is Box Tops, Google Ads (when people click on the ads on my website, I get a small percentage of ad revenue), an Amazon Affiliation (if you use my Amazon link when you purchase something, I get a small percentage of the sale even though it doesn't cost you more), and Tyson Labels. I get Box Tops and Tyson Labels from non-homeschoolers, grandparents, people who've never been on trips with me, etc... just people who want to help us with our trips. They also use my Amazon link because it doesn't cost them extra and they shop a lot on Amazon so it helps us out. All that said - participation in our fundraising isn't required for members or non-members, so if you don't want to participate, you don't have to. I think this answers all of your questions, but if not, let me know. And if my answers lead to more questions, that's fine, too! I know it can get overwhelming! Warmly, Dianna
  16. 2 points
    Hi Meg, I wish I was closer to you. I'm up in Greer and I teach violin (taught for several years in the schools, and now I just teach a few lessons at home to go along with homeschooling.) Anyway, I don't know anyone down there specifically to recommend, but I have a few ideas. Try contacting local stores that rent/sell instruments. They often keep a list of private teachers in the area, you might ask who they recommend and sort of compare notes between stores and see if there are any common names. I don't know much about the stores down there, but I do know Pecknell has a store down your way and I recommend for violin that you stay away from them to rent or buy an instrument. Their instrument quality, up here anyway, is pretty poor. Also, I'm not sure how close you are to USC, but they have an awesome music program. You might find a music education student who could teach violin. It would probably be cheaper for you and give the university student great experience. Lastly, instrument advice. Rent, don't buy. String instruments come in a variety of sizes to fit the child. A music store can size them, as can a teacher (if you're stuck let me know and I'll find the measurements and tell you how to do it. I just eyeball it now.) As the child grows, they have to get a new instrument. This can happen very quickly, or take a number of years. You absolutely do NOT want a child playing on an instrument that is too big for them. Now, that said, if you really, really, really don't want to rent or lease and just want to buy something and sell it later, check out sharmusic.com. They have an inexpensive line of violins that for their price have a good sound. (I have 4 kids, and I bought one for my oldest from them, knowing it would get passed down when he out grew it.) They are a great company, I've been getting things from them since I was a student. Please don't buy from ebay, or the Sears catalogue, etc. Most of those are just violin shaped objects that are essentially useless (won't stay in tune, etc). Anyway, hope some of that helps!
  17. 2 points
    I would be happy to help anyone in the Spartanburg, SC area with getting started homeschooling or anything else. Please message me at johnson.gina04@gmail.com if I can be of service. Gina Johnson
  18. 2 points
    Have you looked at Landry Academy Lab Intensives?
  19. 2 points
    There is no 4.5-hour daily requirement for Option 3 homeschoolers. Warmly, Dianna
  20. 2 points
    I'll try to plan a local get-together after I return from Disney. In the meantime, hopefully other Lancaster families will jump in and everyone can meet somewhere.
  21. 2 points
    Hi Maria, Research overwhelmingly supports the fact that child-led learning is more effective than any other method (children learn more, retain more). The schools can't create this kind of environment because they don't have the resources and it would wreak havoc on crowd control. But homeschoolers can. If children have a say in what they're learning, then the arguing, whining, etc., lessens considerably (or disappears altogether). In my opinion, four years old is too young for children to be doing worksheets/workbooks and other sit-down structured learning unless they initiate it. If you wait until he's older, he'll learn the material much faster, with much less resistance. And if you view learning as a life-long endeavor, does it really matter if your children learn to write the alphabet (or whatever) at 4.5, rather than at 6 or 7 or even later? I can almost guarantee it's not going to come up in a college scholarship or job interview. They won't care. For your 6-year-old, can you reduce the amount of writing each day? Maybe one math worksheet, and one handwriting? Phonics (again, my opinion), should be oral, not written. For my children, I taught them the basic letter sounds and blends using AlphaPhonics as a guide. I didn't use the entire book - once they had the consonants, vowels, and basic blends down, I put it aside and we read real books - starting with the simple Bob Books and working up to more complex beginning reader books, then beginning chapter books, etc. (It's amazing how much reading/phonics publishers - both mainstream and homeschool - can take something simple and make it so complex that instruction stretches out over several years or more.) My children also listen(ed) to audiobooks and we always have closed-captioned on when we watch television. I'd also recommend waiting until your son is older for journal writing. Just focus on handwriting for now, and as he gets older and more skilled with the mechanics, he'll hopefully become more interested in writing. I hope this helps! Take what you think will help, and throw out the rest. Warmly, Dianna
  22. 2 points
    Hi Kristi! We are also relatively new to SC and live about 20 minutes west of Orangeburg, right off of Hwy 4, in Neeses. This will be our first year homeschooling, so all of this is new to us too. We have 3 kids: 5 yo boy, 3 yo boy, and a 2 month old girl. There is a very active and helpful homeschool association in Orangeburg, Orangeburg Christian Home Educators Association (http://ochea.net/about/). I have spoken with one of their directors over the phone who was extremely helpful in guiding me in what steps we needed to take to homeschool legally in SC. OCHEA provides a lot of activities/events. They also have a co-op that meets every other Monday to provide PE, Art and Music classes for the elementary age groups. We will definitely be teaming up with them in the fall. To participate with them, you do have to be a member with an "Option 2" or "Option 3"(such as Carolina Homschooler) accountability group as well since OCHEA is not an accountability group. There are about 3-4 moms who get together every Thursday at the Orangeburg County Library on Louis Street for story time. It's at 10:30 am every Thursday. The story time on Thursday is for ages 2 and up. There's another one on Wednesdays at 10:30 for infants to 3 year olds. Our kids really enjoy story time and getting to spend time with their friends. We moms enjoy getting together to encourage each other as well. Hope this helps! Welcome to Orangeburg!
  23. 1 point
    Hello, I am a new homeschool parent looking for friends and support with homeschooling High school, Elementary school, and Pre-school students. I am not only new to homeschooling but to the Carolinas- we just moved here from San Antonio, Texas! Any advice on scheduling, curriculum, and extracurriculars (especially for my 9th grader) would be much appreciated.
  24. 1 point
    Maria, here's updated information: http://www.homeschoolingsc.org/policy-issue-resolution/ Dianna
  25. 1 point
    I hope others come in to share their views, but I think the first mistake is not charging for your services. As a society, we've been "trained" not to value anything that's free. I used to offer free writing classes online and parents would sign their students up (taking up the limited spots in the class), then many of their students wouldn't participate, or would turn assignments in late and still expect me to evaluate it, etc., etc. I started charging for the same exact course, and it was totally different. Students would participate fully, turn in assignments on time, and it was just a better experience all the way around. If you're not charging for your services, they're (maybe subconsciously?) not valuing what you're doing, and that's where the problem is coming in. My feeling is if you start charging, and only providing services for the time you scheduled (stopping on time, even if that means you'll only tutor for 5 minutes because they showed up 55 minutes late for the hour you scheduled), then they'll either start respecting your time and services, or they'll end the tutoring themselves and you won't have to. So, set an hourly fee, set a strict schedule, don't accommodate them outside of that timeframe, tell them your (and their) time is valuable and the student's cellphone is becoming a distraction for both of you, so from now on you'll take it away the first time someone calls or texts during your tutoring session and give it back to her at the end. (Power it down in the meantime.) If the mom picks her up late, explain that it'll be an extra $10 (or more, you decide) for every 5 minutes she's late, with no tutoring done during that time. The student will just sit and wait for her parent while you move on to other things. If you'd prefer to just get out of the tutoring completely, explain that you no longer have time to tutor because you need to focus on your own student and are planning more field trips, etc., and can't commit. I hope this helps. Take what you like and throw out the rest. Warmly, Dianna
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